James Franklin Is Getting Crushed After Today’s Loss

first_imgA fired up James Franklin cheers on his team.EAST LANSING, MI – NOVEMBER 04: Head coach James Franklin of the Penn State Nittany Lions reacts to a first half touchdown by Saeed Blacknall #13 while playing the Michigan State Spartans at Spartan Stadium on November 4, 2017 in East Lansing, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Penn State head coach James Franklin was direct to the point after the Nittany Lions’ tough loss to Ohio State at Beaver Stadium a couple of weeks ago.The head coach said that Penn State’s football program was a great one, but it wasn’t “elite” yet.Franklin said he was determined to get Penn State to that “elite” level following his team’s loss to the Buckeyes.Well, it hasn’t happened – yet, anyway.Penn State, the No. 8 team in the country, just suffered one of its most-disappointing losses in recent years, falling to Michigan State at home in the final minute.The Spartans scored a touchdown with about 20 seconds left to win the game, handing Penn State its second loss of the season, basically eliminating PSU from any conference title or College Football Playoff contention.Fans aren’t happy.James Franklin is now 3-11 against Ohio State, Michigan, and Michigan State.— Chris Dokish (@ChrisDokish) October 13, 2018James Franklin just moved Penn State’s program from “great” to “good”— Buckeye Videos+ (@BuckeyeVideos) October 13, 2018Joe Moorhead left. James Franklin looks very September of 2016 again. #Science— Matt Zemek (@MattZemek) October 13, 2018Starting to think James Franklin is a cliche’ machine. Completely mismanaged a lead and lost to Ohio St at home and now they have lost to a horrible Mich St team at home as well. Tired of hearing about Good to Great…….I read that book too! Win games!— Jerry “Big O” Ostroski (@Ostroski_BigO) October 13, 2018Beaver Stadium stunned in back to back games. James Franklin walked back on the field to console CB Amani Oruwarye. D-line coach Sean Spencer was in disbelief. pic.twitter.com/K3pnDvKsVA— Audrey Snyder (@audsnyder4) October 13, 2018Losses happen, of course, but it’s understandable for Penn State fans to be furious after back-to-back heartbreaking losses at home.last_img read more

Africa still hungry despite annual 3 billion of aid and 33 billion

11 March 2010One in three Africans is chronically hungry, despite $3 billion spent on food aid for the continent annually and $33 billion in food imports, the director of the food security at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has warned. One in three Africans is chronically hungry, despite $3 billion spent on food aid for the continent annually and $33 billion in food imports, the director of the food security at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has warned.Much of the $33 billion that Africa spends to import food could be better diverted to domestic production for regional and global trade, contributing to poverty reduction and repositioning Africa in the global economy, said Josue Dione, Director of Food Security and Sustainable Development of ECA, at a conference on agribusiness that wrapped up yesterday in Abuja, Nigeria.“African agriculture is thirsty as less than 4 per cent of the total arable land is irrigated compared to 33 per cent in Asia and the Pacific and 29 per cent in the Middle East. African agriculture is hungry as it receives only 14.6 kilograms of fertilizers per hectare, against 114.3 kilograms per hectare for all developing countries,” Mr. Dione said in an address on behalf of the ECA’s Executive Secretary Abdoulie Janneh.Africa’s share in world agriculture trade fell to 3.2 per cent in 2006 from 5.4 per cent in the 1980s and 15 per cent in the 1960s, according to ECA.The continent’s small share in regional and global agricultural trade is strongly associated with a shift in world agricultural trade away from bulk commodities, Mr. Dione said.“Significant part of global agro-food trade has moved downstream along the value chains, and thus become less dependent purely on natural-resource endowment,” Mr. Dione said.Yet moving Africa’s food and agriculture system towards processed, higher value-added products has been more difficult for the continent than for other developing regions.Mr. Dione said while Africa is suffering from a competitive disadvantage in agro-processing, better policies can help improve the business environment and create the conditions necessary for higher private investment in agribusiness.ECA has advocated for the development of regional value chains for selected agricultural commodities, which would allow domestic production to gain more resources.“Developing agriculture for broad-based economic growth, food security and poverty reduction in Africa now requires an integrated approach to investing in improving productivity and efficiency at all stages of the commodity value chains, from research and development, to input markets, farm-level production, processing, storage, handling, transport, distribution to the final consumer,” Mr. Dione said. read more